Clémence von Wassenberg, De Limbourg Arlon

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Clémence von Wassenberg, De Limbourg Arlon

French: Dame Clémence d'Aquitaine (de Poitou de Bouzonville), De Limbourg Arlon
Also Known As: "Clementia de Poitou de Bouzonville d'Aquitaine", "Clemence Von Wassenburg", "Clemence of Poitou", "Clementia van Gelre (van Poitou van Gleiberg)", "Clementia VAN POITOU-AQUITANIË"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Poitiers, Vienne, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, France
Death: January 04, 1142 (77-86)
Wassenberg, Cologne, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
Place of Burial: Wassenberg Wald Friedhof Waldfeucht, Landkreis Heinsberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
Immediate Family:

Daughter of Pierre Guillaume 'l'Aigret' ou 'le Hardi' d'Aquitaine, VII Duc d'Aquitaine, V Comte de Poitou and Ermesinde I de Longwy, Duchess of Aquitaine
Wife of Conrad I, Count of Luxembourg and Count Gerard van Wassenberg, IV
Mother of Ermesinde II, Comtesse de Luxembourg; Judith van Gelder Wassenberg Limburg; Gerhard II, count of Guelders; Adelheid von Wassenberg, Grafin von van Tecklenburg; Yolande van Gelre, Vrouwe van Dodewaard en Dalen, von Wassenberg, Grafin von Gelre von Wassenberg, Countess of Hennegau and 1 other
Sister of Agnes of Aquitaine, countess of Savoy
Half sister of Mathilde de Luxembourg

Occupation: Dame, de Longwy, de Gleiberg, Dame de Longwy - après 1129, Frau von Gleiberg-après 1129, ? - 24 Jun 1141, Countess of Luxembourg
Managed by: Private User
Last Updated:

About Clémence von Wassenberg, De Limbourg Arlon

Clementia of Aquitaine

  • Daughter of William VII, Duke of Aquitaine and Ermensinde de Longwy
  • Clementia of Poitiers (ca. 1060-1142) was a daughter of William VII of Aquitaine and possibly of Ermesinde of Lorraine.
  • Clémence d'Aquitaine (1048, Poitiers, France – 4 January 1130)
  • Her mother was Ermesinde von Lothringen, daughter of Count Adalbert-Albrecht, died - after 1058 . She was the heiress of Longwy.
  • Her father Wilhelm VII. Aigret came to rule through the intrigues of his mother, who led the government for the underage. He fought his stepfather in Anjou and continued the war of inheritance for Gascony against his nephew Bernhard II of Armagnac and occupied parts of it. He died during the siege of Saumur on the Ruhr. - K ienast Walter: Page 213-217
  • Clémence de Poitou von Wassenburg - Find A Grave Memorial

Project MedLands AQUITAINE

Possible granddaughter of Guillaume V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine, there is no indication of the identity of her father if her supposed Poitou origin is correct:

  • 1. [Clementia de Poitou Her marriage and family origin are confirmed by the charter dated 1088 under which "Regina ex prosapia non obscura…comitis Cononis filia qui frater extit Conraldi viri…in itinere Jerosolimitano defuncti, generi nimirum comitis Pictaviensis" donated property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire for the foundation of the priory of Aiwaille[503]. Fabri identifies "Conraldi" as Conrad Comte [de Luxembourg], suggesting that "frater" should be interpreted in this passage to indicate brother-in-law, and that he was therefore the son-in-law ("generi") of "comitis Pictaviensis"[504]. If this alleged Poitou origin of the wife of Comte Conrad is correct, the problem is identifying her father. There are few data points to establish the chronology of the family of the comtes de Luxembourg, but it appears likely that Comte Conrad would have been born in [1030/40]. If this is correct, his Poitou wife would most likely have been a granddaughter of Guillaume V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine [Guillaume III Comte de Poitou]. Secondary sources have suggested that she was the daughter of Duke Guillaume V´s son, Guillaume VII "Acerrimus/l'Aigret" Duke of Aquitaine [Guillaume V Comte de Poitou]. The thrust of the argument from which this conclusion is drawn is an explanation for the transmission of Longwy to the Luxembourg family: Alberic de Trois Fontaines names the wife of Comte Conrad "comitissa de Longui et de Castris Ermensendis"[505], and Comte Conrad´s daughter of the same name is later recorded as holding Longwy. As the family origin of the wives of the other dukes of Aquitaine/comtes de Poitou is known, the argument proceeds on the assumption that Duke Guillaume VII´s wife Ermesinde is the only possible source from whom Longwy could have been inherited. There are several difficulties with this argument. Firstly, the word "gener", used in the 1088 charter, may have been used in a wider sense in the same way as "frater": for example, cases have been observed in other primary sources where "gener" indicates brother-in-law. Secondly, it is far from certain that the passage in Alberic is factually correct: difficulties are suggested by the reference to "Castris", which normally indicates the county of Bliescastel which has not been connected to the wife of Comte Conrad. Thirdly, there is considerable uncertainty over the ownership of Longwy after the death of Comte Manegold in [1040] (see the document UPPER LOTHARINGIAN NOBILITY). Fourthly, the mother of Comte Conrad´s daughter Ermensende (who later held Longwy) is confirmed in another charter (see the document LUXEMBOURG) as Conrad´s known wife Clémence, although it is of course possible that Alberic simply mistook the name and that Clémence was the heiress of Longwy. In conclusion, there are too many variables in this situation to conclude that the wife of Comte Conrad was the daughter of Duke Guillaume VII. married CONRAD Comte [de Luxembourg], son of GISELBERT Graf von Salm, Comte de Luxembourg & his wife (-in Palestine 8 Aug 1086, bur Luxembourg Münster Abbey).]

Project MedLands HOLLAND

GERHARD von Wassenberg, son of DIETRICH "Flamens" Graf [von Wassenberg] & his wife --- (-[before 1129 or 24 Oct [1131]]). The Chronicon Huberti names "Gerardus et Gozwinus filius eius [=Theodericum]" in 1082[981]. Graf von Wassenberg. The Gesta Abbatum Trudonensium records that "Gerardum…de castello…Guassenberge et Gozwinum avunculum eius de castello…Heinesberge" introduced abbot Luipo into the abbey of Saint-Trond in 1085[982]. "Gerardus de Gelre, Arnoldus comes de Berge, Waleramus comes de Lemburg, Gerardus comes de Iuliaco…" signed the charter dated 1085 under which Friedrich Archbishop of Köln donated property to Kloster St Martin, Köln[983]. "Heinricus…Romanorum imperator augustus" confirmed a donation of property "in Traiecto quam comes Gerardus de Wassenbergen invaserat" to St Servatius, Maastricht by charter dated 1087[984]. Graaf van Gelre 1096: "…Gerardi comitis de Gelre et fratris eius Henrici…" witnessed the charter dated 1096 under which "Ida Boloniensis comitissa" donated property in "Genapia" to Afflighem abbey[985]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed the donation of property "in Horenchusen…[et] in Dorwilere" made to Köln St Maria by "Meginherus de Randenrode cum neque uxorem neque filium haberet", in the presence of "fratre suo Hartberno", by charter dated 13 Apr 1104 witnessed by "Gerhart de Gelleron comes, Gerhart comes de Iulicho et frater eius Gerlach, Gerhart de Hochstaden, Dieterich de Mere, Heriman de Zulpico…"[986]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln donated serfs to Köln St Severin, with the consent of "Francone urbis nostre prefecto", by charter dated 1109, witnessed by "Gerhardo comite de Gelre, Adelberto de Safenberg, Adelberto de Nervennich, Herimanno de Udenkircha, Gerhardo de Julicho, Gerhardo de Hoinstathe, Gerlacho de Isenburch et fratre sui Regenbaldo, Harperno de Randenrothe…"[987]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln donated property to Kloster Rees by charter dated 1112 witnessed by "Henricus dux de Lintburg, Almer advocatus, Hugo, Adolf comes de Safenberk, Advocatus Teodericus, Comes Gerhardus et filius eius Gerhardus…"[988]. "…Gerhardus comes de Gelleren et filius eius Gerhardus…" witnessed the charter dated 1117 under which Friedrich Archbishop of Köln donated property to Meregelpe[989]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed the dismissal of "comes Gerhardus et frater eius Heinricus" from the Vogteischaft of Kloster Siegburg by charter dated 5 Apr 1118 witnessed by "Comes Gerhardus et frater eius Heinricus, Comes Adolfus de Monte, Comes Adolfus de Saphenberg, Comes Gerhardus de Iuliaco, Gerhardus iunior filius Gerhardi, Gerhardus de Caesle, Arnulfus de Odenkirche"[990]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed donations to Kloster Dunwald and shared the Vogteischaft with "comitis Adolphi" by charter dated 1118 witnessed by "Adolfus comes de Monte et frater eius Euerhardus, Gerardus comes de Wassenberg [%E2%80%A6et filius eius Gerardus], Theodericus comes de Thonburch, Theodericus comes de Ara, domnus Goswinus de Hennesberg et frater eius Gerardus…Gerardus de Wyckerode…"[991]. "Comes Gerhardus" founded a church "in meo allodio Wassenberg" by charter dated 30 Sep 1118[992]. [Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed a donation to Kloster Siegburg by charter dated 1129 witnessed by "…Liberi. Paganus dux, Franco burgicomes, Gerhardus comes de Gelre, Adolfus comes de Monte, Adolfus comes de Saffenberg…"[993]. It is unclear whether this document refers to Gerhard [I] or Gerhard [II].] [The necrology of Wassenberg records the death 24 Oct [1131] of “dominus Gerardus Longus comes Gelrie, qui fuit fundator et dotator huius ecclesie in Wassenberg”[994]. It is unclear from this document whether it refers to Gerhard [I] or Gerhard [II].]
married [firstly] Unknown. The name and origin of the wife of Gerhard is not known. [married secondly] as her [second/third] husband, CLEMENTIA, widow [firstly] of CONRAD Comte [de Luxembourg] [and secondly of --- Graf von Gleiberg], daughter of --- (-after 1141). This marriage is confirmed by the second version of a charter confirming the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg, dated 1129, which records the donation made by "Clementia comitissa de Glizberc…per manum Gerhardi mariti sui comitis de Gelre"[995]. The donor is identified in other sources as the widow of Conrad [I] Comte [de Luxembourg] (see LUXEMBOURG). Szabolcs de Vajay dismisses Clementia’s supposed [second/third] marriage, assuming that the document in question is spurious[996]. However, the language of the document is not obviously anachronistic, the only surprising element being the large number of witnesses. See FRANCONIA NOBILITY for discussion about Clementia’s possible [second] marriage.]

Gerhard & his [first] wife had three children:

  • 1. JUTTA ([1087]-Rolduc 24 Jun 1151, bur Rolduc [Rode] abbey). The Chronicon Hanoniense records that "Balduinus comes Hanoniensis" married "Yolendem…comitis de Ghelra filiam", and that "aliam…eiusdem comitis de Ghelra filiam" married "Henricus dux de Lemborch" who inherited "castrum Wassemberghe" from her, a later passage adding that the father of the daughters was "comitis de Ghelra Gerardi"[997]. The chronology dictates that her husband was Walram [II] Graaf van Limburg not Hendrik. Heiress of Wassenberg. The Annales Rodenses record that in 1151 “Jutta ducissa, Walrami ducis de Leimburch uxor et Heinrici ejusdem ducis filii mater” donated “ecclesie...apud Lomunsheim” to Rolduc [Rode] abbey, died “VIII Kal Jul” and was buried in the abbey[998]. Henri Bishop of Liège confirmed the donations made by "domina Jutta, nobilissima matrona uxor ducis Walrami de Lemburg" to Rolduc [Rode] abbey, with the consent of "filiis suis Domino Henrico et Gerardo" by charter dated 1151, which records the presence at her burial in Rolduc [Rode] of "filii eiusdem Henricus et Gerardus et filiolus Domini Heinrici, eiusdem nominis, Arnoldus quoque filius Ruberti comitis de Lunneburg natus ex domina Beatrice filia præfatæ dominæ, et Theodericus filius Ekberti comitis de Titkelenburg natus ex alia filia"[999]. The necrology of Stavelot records the deaths "XVII Kal Aug" of "Walrani duci…dna Judith juge sua"[1000]. married ([1107/10]%29 WALRAM [II] "Paganus" van Limburg, son of HENDRIK [I] Graaf van Limburg, Duke of Lower Lotharingia & his [second] wife Adelheid von Botenstein ([1080/85]-6 Aug 1139). Comte d'Arlon. Graaf van Limburg. He was installed as WALERAN Duke of Lower Lotharingia in 1128.
  • 2. YOLANDE van Gelre (-after 1122, bur Mons). The Chronicon Hanoniense records that "Balduinus comes Hanoniensis" married "Yolendem…comitis de Ghelra filiam", in a later passage naming them "Balduinus comes Hanoniensis, Balduini comitis et Yde comitisse filius" and "Yolendem comitis de Ghelra Gerardi filiam"[1001]. Heiress of Dodenweerd. The Liber de Restauratione Sancti Martini Tornacensis names "Hiolendem, filiam Gerardi Babinbergensis comitis" as wife Comte Baudouin, in breach of his vow to "Clementia Flandrensis comitissa" to marry "neptem suam" (who later married "Ludovico regi Francorum")[1002]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Yolendis de Gelra" as mother of "comiti Balduini de Haynaco"[1003]. The Chronicon Hanoniense records that "Yoandis comitissa vidua" married secondly "Godefrido de Bochesin castellano Valencenensi", by whom she was mother of "filium…Godefridum et filiam Bertam [uxorem] comiti de Duraz, deinde nupsit Egidio de Sancto Oberto a quo filium…Gerardum et filiam…[uxorem] Nicholao de Barbencione"[1004]. Regent of Hainaut. m firstly ([1107]%29 BAUDOUIN III Comte de Hainaut, son of BAUDOUIN II Comte de Hainaut & his wife Ida de Louvain (1088-1120). m secondly GODEFROI [II] de Ribemont Châtelain de Valenciennes, son of GODEFROI [I] de Ribemont Châtelain de Valenciennes & his wife Agnes de Roucy.
  • 3. GERHARD [II] (-24 Oct [1131], bur Wassenberg). Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln donated property to Kloster Rees by charter dated 1112 witnessed by "Henricus dux de Lintburg, Almer advocatus, Hugo, Adolf comes de Safenberk, Advocatus Teodericus, Comes Gerhardus et filius eius Gerhardus…"[1005]. "…Gerhardus comes de Gelleren et filius eius Gerhardus…" witnessed the charter dated 1117 under which Friedrich Archbishop of Köln donated property to Meregelpe[1006]. Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed donations to Kloster Dunwald and shared the Vogteischaft with "comitis Adolphi" by charter dated 1118 witnessed by "…Gerardus comes de Wassenberg [%E2%80%A6et filius eius Gerardus]…"[1007]. Graaf van Gelre. [Friedrich [I] Archbishop of Köln confirmed a donation to Kloster Siegburg by charter dated 1129 witnessed by "…Liberi. Paganus dux, Franco burgicomes, Gerhardus comes de Gelre, Adolfus comes de Monte, Adolfus comes de Saffenberg…"[1008]. It is unclear whether this document refers to Gerhard [I] or Gerhard [II].] The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop records that "Gherit" was installed as "grave van Gelre" in 1107 and died in 1131, adding that he married "greve Floris van Hollants dochter"[1009]. The last statement does not appear consistent with other sources. [The necrology of Wassenberg records the death 24 Oct [1131] of “dominus Gerardus Longus comes Gelrie, qui fuit fundator et dotator huius ecclesie in Wassenberg”[1010]. It is unclear from this document whether it refers to Gerhard [I] or Gerhard [II].] married ([1115/17]%29 as her first husband, ERMGARD van Zutphen, daughter of OTTO [II] "der Reiche" Graaf van Zutphen & his wife Judith --- (-after 1134). A charter dated 1134 records the donation by "Domina Ermengardis comitissa…hæres legitima oppidi Sutphaniensis…cum marito suo Cunrado comite de Lucelenburg et filio suo Henrico" of "ecclesiam Lochemensem", confirmed by the bishop of Utrecht, for the souls of "mariti sui Gerardi…domini Ottonis comitis patris sui et matris suæ Judithæ et fratrum suorum piæ memoriæ…episcopi Theodrici et comitum Henrici et Gerardi"[1011]. She married secondly (before 1134) Conrad II Comte de Luxembourg.

Gerhard [II] & his wife had two children:

  • a) HENDRIK ([1117]-[27 May/10 Sep] 1182, bur Kloster Kamp). The Kronik van Arent toe Bocop names "Henderick" as son of "Gherit…grave van Gelre", adding that he succeeded his father in 1131[1012]. He succeeded as HENDRIK Graaf van Gelre, Graaf van Zutphen.
  • b) SALOME (-before 1194). The Annales Stadenses refer to the wife of "Heinricum frater Christiani [de Aldenburg]" as "sororem comitis Heinrici de Gelre" but does not name her[1013]. A charter dated 1167 records the marriage of an unnamed daughter of Graf Heinrich and Wedekind von Stumpenhausen, and specifies that “Heinricus frater Cristiani”, who had married “sororem Heinrici comitis de Gelre” by whom he had “Heinricum et Gerardum postea clericam et filiam quam duxit Wedekindus de Stumpenhusen filius Geronis”[1014]. The primary source which confirms her name has not yet been identified. married HEINRICH [I] Graf von [Wildeshausen], son of EGILMAR [II] Graf & his wife Eilika von Rietberg (-1167).

Project MedLands LUXEMBOURG

CONRAD, son of GISELBERT Graf von Salm [Luxembourg] & his wife --- (-in Palestine 8 Aug 1086, bur [1090 Luxembourg Münster Abbey]). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitis Conradis" as son of "Gislebertus comes de Luscelenburch"[164]. Vogt of St Maximin at Trier and of Stablo. He succeeded his father in [1056/59] as Comte [de Luxembourg]. He captured Eberhard Archbishop of Trier, for which he was excommunicated[165]. "Conradus comes" founded the Benedictine abbey of Münster [Altm%C3%BCnster] in Luxembourg, with the consent of "uxore mea Clementia cum filiis et filiabus nostris", by charter dated 7 Jul 1083[166]. He died while on the pilgrimage which had been required before his excommunication could be lifted[167]. He is referred to as "Comes de Luccilinburg" on the seals of Münster abbey, the first of his family to which this title was ascribed[168]. The Chronicon of Bernold records the death in 1086 of "Chonradus comes, frater Heremanni regis" while on pilgrimage to Jerusalem[169]. His tomb at Münster records the death of “comes Conradus...peregrinus sepultus in terra decenter non sua...VI Id Aug” 1086, the return of his body four years later, and its burial in the presence of “conjuge sua Clementia, per manum Adalberonis primicerii Metensis, Henrici comitis, Conrardique comitis...Rodolpho abbate filio comitis”[170]. There is considerable confusion regarding the wife or wives of Comte Conrad. It is likely that Comte Conrad married twice. Alternatively, he may have had a single wife to whom all the references below refer, although if this was correct she would have had a considerable lifespan considering that Conrad´s grandson by his daughter Mathilde is named in 1087 (see below): [married --- de Poitou, daughter of --- [Duke of Aquitaine, Comte de Poitou] & his wife. Her marriage and family origin are confirmed by the charter dated 1088 under which "Regina ex prosapia non obscura…comitis Cononis filia qui frater extit Conraldi viri…in itinere Jerosolimitano defuncti, generi nimirum comitis Pictaviensis" donated property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire for the foundation of the priory of Aiwaille[171]. Fabri identifies "Conradi" as Conrad Comte de Luxembourg, suggesting that "frater" should be interpreted to indicate brother-in-law, the text indicating that Conrad was son-in-law of "comitis Pictaviensis"[172]. If this alleged Poitou origin of the wife of Comte Conrad is correct, the problem is identifying her father. There are few data points to establish the chronology of the family of the comtes de Luxembourg, but it appears likely that Comte Conrad would have been born in [1030/40]. If this is correct, his Poitou wife would most likely have been a granddaughter of Guillaume V "le Grand" Duke of Aquitaine [Guillaume III Comte de Poitou]. Secondary sources have suggested that she was the daughter of Duke Guillaume V´s son, Guillaume VII "Acerrimus/l'Aigret" Duke of Aquitaine [Guillaume V Comte de Poitou]. The thrust of the argument from which this conclusion is drawn is an explanation for the transmission of Longwy to the Luxembourg family: Alberic de Trois Fontaines names the wife of Comte Conrad "comitissa de Longui et de Castris Ermensendis"[173], and Comte Conrad´s daughter of the same name is later recorded as holding Longwy. As the family origin of the wives of the other dukes of Aquitaine/comtes de Poitou is known, the argument proceeds on the assumption that Duke Guillaume VII´s wife Ermesinde is the only possible source from whom Longwy could have been inherited. There are several difficulties with this argument. Firstly, the word "gener", used in the 1088 charter, may have been used in a wider sense in the same way as "frater": for example, cases have been observed in other primary sources where "gener" indicates brother-in-law. Secondly, it is far from certain that the passage in Alberic is factually correct: as noted below, difficulties are suggested by the reference to "Castris", which normally indicates the county of Bliescastel which has not been connected to the wife of Comte Conrad. Thirdly, there is considerable uncertainty over the ownership of Longwy after the death of Comte Manegold in [1040] (see the document UPPER LOTHARINGIA NOBILITY). Fourthly, the mother of Comte Conrad´s daughter Ermensende (who later held Longwy) is confirmed in another charter (see below) as Conrad´s known wife Clémence, although it is of course possible that Alberic simply mistook the name and that Clémence was the heiress of Longwy. In conclusion, there are too many variables in this situation to conclude that the wife of Comte Conrad was the daughter of Guillaume VII Duke of Aquitaine.]
[married [firstly] ERMENSENDE [Ctss de Longwy], daughter of unknown. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitissa de Longui et de Castris Ermensendis" as wife of "Conrado comiti de Luscelenburch"[174]. "Castris" is normally the Latin name used for Bliescastel (see the document UPPER LOTHARINGIA NOBILITY). No connection has been identified between Ermensende’s ancestors and the family of the Grafen von Bliescastel, although her daughter’s husband was Graf von Bliescastel: maybe Ermensende was the heiress of Bliescastel which she passed to her daughter. Concerning Longwy, according to the Gesta Episcoporum Virdunensium, it was held in the 1140s by Adalbert [Graf von Metz] Duke of Upper Lotharingia: the Gesta names "Albertum de Longui castro, quem…ducem", the text appearing to refer to the duke of Upper Lotharingia who was killed in 1148[175]. If this is correct, it is possible that the wife of Comte Conrad was Ermensende, daughter of Adalbert Duke of Lower Lotharingia. However, no other record has been found of Longwy being in the possession of the family of the Grafen von Metz. Szabolcs de Vajay suggests that the Gesta incorrectly attributes Longwy to Duke Adalbert, confusing him with Albert [II] Graf von Dagsburg, first husband of Ermensende de Luxembourg, daughter of Comte Conrad, who is later recorded as heiress of Longwy[176]. No other indication has been found of the ownership of Longwy during the period [1140/60]. This proposed parentage of the wife of Comte Conrad should be considered as highly speculative. Another possibility is that Alberic misquoted the name of the countess and that Ermensende was an error for Clémence.] married secondly] (before 1080) [as her first husband,] CLEMENTIA, daughter of --- (-after 1141). Her [first] marriage is confirmed by the charter dated 7 Jul 1083 under which "Conradus comes" founded the Benedictine abbey of Münster [Altm%C3%BCnster] in Luxembourg, with the consent of "uxore mea Clementia cum filiis et filiabus nostris"[177]. "Conradus cum uxore mea Clementia" founded the abbey of Münster at Luxembourg, with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico, Conradi et Wilhelmo", by charter dated 1080[178]. The tomb of her husband at Münster records the death of “comes Conradus...peregrinus sepultus in terra decenter non sua...VI Id Aug” 1086, the return of his body four years later, and its burial in the presence of “conjuge sua Clementia, per manum Adalberonis primicerii Metensis, Henrici comitis, Conrardique comitis...Rodolpho abbate filio comitis”[179]. Meginher Archbishop of Trier confirmed the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg by "Clementia…comitissa" with the consent of "filii sui Willehelmi et filie Irmesindis" by charter dated 17 Jun 1129[180]. It is possible that Clémence married [secondly/thirdly] [as his second wife,] Gerhard [I] Graaf van Gelre. Her supposed [second/third] marriage is confirmed by a second version of the charter confirming the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg, dated 1129, which records the donation made by "Clementia comitissa de Glizberc…per manum Gerhardi mariti sui comitis de Gelre", with the consent of "palatine comitisse Gertrudis" (identified as Gertrud von Northeim, widow of Siegfried Graf von Orlamünde, Pfalzgrafen von Lothringen, and wife of Otto von Salm Graf von Rheineck) to whom one fourth part of the property belonged[181]. Szabolcs de Vajay dismisses this supposed [second/third] marriage, considering that this second Schiffenberg document is a falsification[182]. However, the language of the document is not obviously anachronistic, the only surprising element being the large number of witnesses. The doubts surrounding the authenticity of these documents is discussed at length by Wyss[183]. "Clementia comitissa de Glizberg cum meis nepotibus Ottone et Wilhelmo" confirmed the foundation of Schiffenberg, with the consent of "domne Gertrudis palatine…[et] Adela filia eiusdem palatine", by charter dated 1141[184]. A highly speculative [second] marriage to --- Graf von Gleiberg is also suggested by the documents relating to Clementia´s supposed [second/third] marriage, because of the two references to her as “comitissa de Glizberc”. No primary source document has yet been identified in which Clementia´s [first] husband is described as “Graf von Gleiberg”. Nor has any record been found of the county of Gleiberg being held by her son by this [first] marriage, Guillaume [I] Comte de Luxembourg, nor by Guillaume´s son Conrad [II] Comte de Luxembourg. One possible explanation is that Clementia was not in fact heiress of Gleiberg, although she is often described as such in contemporary secondary sources, and that she was accorded the title in the 1129 and 1141 as the widow of an otherwise unidentified “Graf von Gleiberg” whom she married after the death of Conrad [I] Comte de Luxembourg. If that is correct, this shadowy [second] husband may have been the uncle or great-uncle of the cousins Otto and Wilhelm who are named above and who would have inherited the title after his death. If Clementia was dowager countess of Gleiberg, maybe continuing to hold part of the county as dower from her [second] husband, this would explain the necessity of her acting jointly with her nephews in the 1129 and 1141 documents.

Comte Conrad & his [first] wife had one child:

  • 1. MATHILDE de Luxembourg (-after 1070). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitem Guilelmum de Luscelenburg…et Ermensendem…et Mathildem" as children of "Conrado comiti de Luscelenburch" and his wife Ermensende, specifying that Mathilde was "comitissam de Longui et de Homborc et de Castris" and that she was mother of "comitem Folmerum et sorores eius Helvidem, quam habuit comes Gerardus de Reneke dyocesis Herbipolensis et illam qua dux de Bronsviic genuit filiam, que in Sclavia hereditavit"[185]. It is improbable, from a chronological point of view, that Mathilde was the daughter of Conrad´s wife Clementia, assuming that the latter is the same person who is named in charters dated 1141 (see above). Considering that Mathilde´s son is named in 1087, it is unlikely that Mathilde herself could have been born much later than [1065]. If that is correct, Clementia would have been a centenarian when she died after 1141, which is unlikely. It is therefore probable that Mathilde was born from an earlier marriage of her father´s. m GOTTFRIED [III] Graf im Bliesgau, son of FOLMAR [VI] Comte de Metz & his wife Suanehilde --- (-1098 or after). 1075/98.

Comte Conrad & his [first/second] wife had four children:

  • 2. HENRI de Luxembourg (-after 12 Apr 1095). "Conradus cum uxore mea Clementia" founded the abbey of Münster at Luxembourg, with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico, Conradi et Wilhelmo", by charter dated 1080[186]. He succeeded his father in 1086 as HENRI III Comte de Luxembourg. The tomb of his father at Münster records the death of “comes Conradus...peregrinus sepultus in terra decenter non sua...VI Id Aug” 1086, the return of his body four years later, and its burial in the presence of “conjuge sua Clementia, per manum Adalberonis primicerii Metensis, Henrici comitis, Conrardique comitis...Rodolpho abbate filio comitis”[187]. “Heinricus comes Coenradi piæ memoriæ comitis filius” swore to defend the church of Echternach by charter dated 1095, subscribed by “Heinricus palatinus, Herimannus Herimanni comitis filius et frater eius Theodericus…”[188]. He made a peace treaty with the archbishop of Trier and supported the emperor in the investiture conflict[189].
  • 3. RUDOLF de Luxembourg (-1099). Abbé de Saint-Vannes at Verdun 1075/99. His brother installed him as abbot of Münster at Luxembourg after 1083[190]. The tomb of his father at Münster records the death of “comes Conradus...peregrinus sepultus in terra decenter non sua...VI Id Aug” 1086, the return of his body four years later, and its burial in the presence of “conjuge sua Clementia, per manum Adalberonis primicerii Metensis, Henrici comitis, Conrardique comitis...Rodolpho abbate filio comitis”[191].
  • 4. CONRAD de Luxembourg (-after 1090). "Conradus cum uxore mea Clementia" founded the abbey of Münster at Luxembourg, with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico, Conradi et Wilhelmo", by charter dated 1080[192]. The tomb of his father at Münster records the death of “comes Conradus...peregrinus sepultus in terra decenter non sua...VI Id Aug” 1086, the return of his body four years later, and its burial in the presence of “conjuge sua Clementia, per manum Adalberonis primicerii Metensis, Henrici comitis, Conrardique comitis...Rodolpho abbate filio comitis”[193].
  • 5. ADALBERO de Luxembourg (-killed Antioch early 1098). Archdeacon at Metz Cathedral. The tomb of his father at Münster records the death of “comes Conradus...peregrinus sepultus in terra decenter non sua...VI Id Aug” 1086, the return of his body four years later, and its burial in the presence of “conjuge sua Clementia, per manum Adalberonis primicerii Metensis, Henrici comitis, Conrardique comitis...Rodolpho abbate filio comitis”[194]. Albert of Aix records that "filium comitis Cunradi de Luezelenburch, Adelberonem…clericum et archidiaconum Metensis ecclesiæ, juvenem" played dice with a noble lady in an orchard outside Antioch, where they were surprised by Turks who beheaded Adalbero, kidnapped the lady, and later catapulted their heads across the plain from the ramparts of the city, dated to early 1098 from the context[195].

Comte Conrad & his [second] wife had two children:

  • 6. ERMENSENDE de Luxembourg (-26 Jun 1141). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitem Guilelmum de Luscelenburg…et Ermensendem…et Mathildem" as children of "Conrado comiti de Luscelenburch" and his wife Ermensende, specifying that Ermesinde was wife of "Namucensem…comitis Godefridi"[196]. Ermensende´s correct parentage is stated in the charter dated 17 Jun 1129 under which Meginher Archbishop of Trier confirmed the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg by "Clementia…comitissa" with the consent of "filii sui Willehelmi et filie Irmesindis"[197]. "Ermensendis comitissa Namucensis" confirmed the prior donation of property to the church of Verdun Sainte-Vanne by "senioris mei comitis Alberti" by charter dated to [1124], subscribed by "domni mei Godefridi comitis et filii mei Henrici comitis, Hugonis filii Folmari comitis, Everardi filii Aiulfi comitis"[198]. "Ermensendis comitissa de Muhalt, quæ uxor…comitis Alberti" founded the monastery of Saint-Victor, Huy by charter dated 1130[199]. Heiress of Luxembourg and Longwy, after the death of her nephew Comte Conrad [II] in 1136. "Comitissa de Musal Ermensendis cum viro suo Namucensi comite Godefrido" donated property to Flône, at the request of "Guntranni et Gisle uxoris eius", by charter dated 1137[200]. In a charter dated 1139, "Albero…Leodiensium episcopus" notes a donation of property to the abbey of Marcigny-sur-Loire by "domna Ermensendis comitissa de Musalt, quæ uxor extitit…comitis Alberici" on the suggestion of "quadam nobili et religiosa fœmina nomine Regina, sibi enim consanguinea"[201], the original donation presumably being dated before [1109] when Ermesinde married her second husband. It is likely that "Regina" in this charter was Regina von Oltingen, whose mother was first cousin to Ermesinde. The necrology of Verdun Saint-Vanne records the death "VIII Kal Jun" of "Ermensendis comitissa Namucensis qui cum viro suo…comite Alberto cellam Montis Sancti Martini…confirmavit"[202]. m firstly as his second wife, ALBERT [II] Graf von Dagsburg, son of [ALBERT [I] de Moha & his wife ---] (-24 Aug 1098). m secondly ([1109]%29 as his second wife, GODEFROI [I] Comte de Namur, son of ALBERT [III]

Comte de Namur & his wife Ida von Sachsen (-19 Aug 1139).

  • 7. GUILLAUME de Luxembourg (before 1080-[17 Jun 1129/1131]). "Conradus cum uxore mea Clementia" founded the abbey of Münster at Luxembourg, with the consent of "filiis meis Henrico, Conradi et Wilhelmo", by charter dated 1080[203]. The Gesta Treverorum names "comite Willehelmo filio Cuonradi comitis de castello Lucelenburch"[204]. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "comitem Guilelmum de Luscelenburg…et Ermensendem…et Mathildem" as children of "Conrado comiti de Luscelenburch" and his wife Ermensende[205]. Guillaume´s correct parentage is stated in the following two charters. “Wilhelmus comes de Lucemburgh...et filius meus Conradus” confirmed donations, made in 1183 by “patrem meum Conradum comitem...annuente matre mea Clementia et fratribus meis” to the abbey of Luxembourg by charter dated to [1123][206]. Meginher Archbishop of Trier confirmed the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg by "Clementia…comitissa" with the consent of "filii sui Willehelmi et filie Irmesindis" by charter dated 17 Jun 1129[207]. The tomb of his father at Münster records the death of “comes Conradus...peregrinus sepultus in terra decenter non sua...VI Id Aug” 1086, the return of his body four years later, and its burial in the presence of “conjuge sua Clementia, per manum Adalberonis primicerii Metensis, Henrici comitis, Conrardique comitis...Rodolpho abbate filio comitis”[208]. "…Wilhelmus comes de Lutzelenburg cognate mei…" subscribed the charter dated 1093 under which "Heinricus…comes palatinus Rheni et dominus de Lacu…uxore mei Adleide" founded the abbey of Laach[209]. Vogt of Echternach 1096. He succeeded his brother in [1096] as GUILLAUME I Comte de Luxembourg. Richard de Grandpré, Bishop of Verdun, invested him in 1109 with the counties of Stenay and Mouzay, which had been confiscated by Heinrich IV King of Germany from Matilda Ctss of Tuscany in 1085 and were eventually ceded to the bishopric of Verdun[210]. Guillaume was excommunicated by Bruno Archbishop of Trier after appropriating land in 1111 from the monastery of St Maximin[211]. Wyss states that Conrad confirmed his father´s foundation of Münster abbey by charter dated 1122 (no primary source cited)[212]. “Counradus Dux de Zaringen, Gotefridus comes palatinus de Calewo, Adelbertus Comes de Lewinstein fratruelis eiusdem Gotefridi palatini, Hugo comes de Tagesburc, Volmarus Comes de Huneburc, Willehelmus Comes de Lucelenburc, Addelbero Comes de Areburc et frater eius Herimannus et ipse Comes Counradus de Horeburc...” witnessed the charter dated 1123 under which Emperor Heinrich V [IV] confirmed the foundation of Alpirsbach monastery[213]. "Willelmus comes de Luzzelenburch, Hermanus comes de Caluerlage, Reinoldus comes, Conradus comes, Arnoldus comes, Gerlagus comes, Imeko comes, Gerhardus comes de Heinnersberch, Hermannus comes de Salmena et filius eius, Friderikus comes de Sarebrugge…" witnessed the charter dated 27 Dec 1127 under which Lothar King of Germany granted property in Dreiech to "ministeriali Cuonrado de Hagen…[et] uxori suæ Liuckardi"[214]. Meginher Archbishop of Trier confirmed the foundation of Kloster Schiffenberg by "Clementia…comitissa" with the consent of "filii sui Willehelmi et filie Irmesindis" by charter dated 17 Jun 1129[215]. m ([1105]%29 LUITGARD von Beichlingen, daughter of KUNO von Northeim Graf von Beichlingen & his wife Kunigunde von Orlamünde. The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Lutgardis" as wife of "comitem Guilelmum de Luscelenburg" but does not give her origin[216]. The Annalista Saxo records (but does not name, except for the fourth daughter) the four daughters of Kuno & his wife, one of whom (listed second) married "Willehelmus comes de Licelenburh"[217].

Comte Guillaume I & his wife had [three] children:

  • a) CONRAD de Luxembourg (-1136). The Chronicle of Alberic de Trois-Fontaines names "Conrardi" as son of "comitem Guilelmum de Luscelenburg" & his wife[218]. “Wilhelmus comes de Lucemburgh...et filius meus Conradus” confirmed donations, made in 1183 by “patrem meum Conradum comitem...annuente matre mea Clementia et fratribus meis” to the abbey of Luxembourg by charter dated to [1123][219]. He succeeded his father in [1129/31] as CONRAD II Comte de Luxembourg. married (before 1134) as her second husband, ERMGARD van Zutphen, widow of GERHARD [II] Graaf van Gelre, daughter of OTTO [II] "der Reiche" Graaf van Zutphen & his wife Judith. A charter dated 1134 records the donation by "Domina Ermengardis comitissa…hæres legitima oppidi Sutphaniensis…cum marito suo Cunrado comite de Lucelenburg et filio suo Henrico" of "ecclesiam Lochemensem", confirmed by the bishop of Utrecht, for the souls of "mariti sui Gerardi…domini Ottonis comitis patris sui et matris suæ Judithæ et fratrum suorum piæ memoriæ…episcopi Theodrici et comitum Henrici et Gerardi"[220].

Comte Conrad II & his wife had [one possible child]:

  • i) [OTTO (-after 1162). Graf von Gleiberg 1141/62. Otto is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln as the son of Conrad II Comte de Luxembourg, and therefore the great-grandson of Conrad I Comte de Luxembourg and his [second] wife Clementia[221]. That hypothesis is presumably based on the following two documents: firstly, "Clementia comitissa de Glizberg cum meis nepotibus Ottone et Wilhelmo" confirmed the foundation of Schiffenberg, with the consent of "domne Gertrudis palatine…[et] Adela filia eiusdem palatine", by charter dated 1141[222]; secondly, "Wilhelmus et Otto comites de Glizperch, consanguinei" confirmed the foundation of Schiffenberg, by "domna Clementia quondam in Glizpurch comitissa, consanguinea nostra", by charter dated 1141[223]. These two documents show that Otto and Wilhelm Grafen von Gleiberg were not brothers but related more distantly ("consanguinei"), maybe first or second cousins. The documents also show that they were related to Clementia, widow of Conrad I Comte de Luxembourg ("consanguinea nostra"). The reconstruction shown in Europäische Stammtafeln assumes that "nepotibus" in the first document should be interpreted as "grandchildren". However, it is not at all clear that this interpretation can be correct. If it was, why would they describe Clementia in the second document using the imprecise term "consanguinea" when she would have been, respectively, their great-grandmother and grandmother? An alternative possibility is therefore that Otto and Wilhelm were not members of the Luxembourg family at all but were related to Clementia through her own family (or the family of another of her husbands), assuming that "nepotibus" should be interpreted as "nephews". This hypothesis would also explain why the county of Luxembourg was not inherited by any member of this "Gleiberg" family on the death of Comte Conrad II, but passed to Conrad´s paternal aunt Ermensende.]
  • b) LIUTGARD de Luxembourg' (-9 Mar [before 1170], bur Grandpré Saint-Médard). The Genealogiæ Scriptoris Fusniacensis names the wife of "Henricus Waflart comes Grandi-prati" as "comitissam de Luceleburch"[224]. Heiress of Luxembourg: the Chronicon Hanoniense refers to "Willelmi comitis de Lusceleborch…filiam…uxor comes de Grandi-Prato" when recording that her first cousin "Henricus comes Namurcensis" challenged her succession in Luxembourg after her father died[225]. Barthélemy records that Henri [II] received “des droits sur le comté de Thionville, la vouerie de Saint-Maximin de Trèves et de Saint-Willebrod d’Eternach” from his wife, without citing the source which confirms the information[226]. The necrology of Reims Saint-Denis records the death “VII Id Mar” of “Leucardis comitissa de Grandi Prato” and the donation of “allodium de Femuis” made by “Henricus maritus eius” to “sancto Medardo”[227]. Barthélemy says that Liutgard died “avant 1170” and was buried as Grandpré Saint-Médard, without citing the source which confirms the information[228]. m [as his second wife,] HENRI [II] Comte de Grandpré, son of HENRI [I] Comte de Grandpré et de Porcien & his wife Ermentrude de Joux [Grandson] (-[1188/90], bur Foigny).
  • c) [WILHELM (-after 1158). Graf von Gleiberg. Wilhelm is shown in Europäische Stammtafeln as the son of Conrad II Comte de Luxembourg, and therefore the grandson of Conrad I Comte de Luxembourg and his [second] wife Clementia[229]. That hypothesis is presumably based on the following two documents: firstly, "Clementia comitissa de Glizberg cum meis nepotibus Ottone et Wilhelmo" confirmed the foundation of Schiffenberg, with the consent of "domne Gertrudis palatine…[et] Adela filia eiusdem palatine", by charter dated 1141[230]; secondly, "Wilhelmus et Otto comites de Glizperch, consanguinei" confirmed the foundation of Schiffenberg, by "domna Clementia quondam in Glizpurch comitissa, consanguinea nostra", by charter dated 1141[231]. These two documents show that Otto and Wilhelm Grafen von Gleiberg were not brothers but related more distantly ("consanguinei"), maybe first or second cousins. The documents also show that they were related to Clementia, widow of Conrad I Comte de Luxembourg ("consanguinea nostra"). The reconstruction shown in Europäische Stammtafeln assumes that "nepotibus" in the first document should be interpreted as "grandchildren". However, it is not at all clear that this interpretation can be correct. If it was, why would they describe Clementia in the second document using the imprecise term "consanguinea" when she would have been, respectively, their great-grandmother and grandmother? An alternative possibility is therefore that Otto and Wilhelm were not members of the Luxembourg family at all but were related to Clementia through her own family (or the family of another of her husbands), assuming that "nepotibus" should be interpreted as "nephews". This hypothesis would also explain why the county of Luxembourg was not inherited by any member of this "Gleiberg" family on the death of Comte Conrad II, but passed to Conrad´s paternal aunt Ermensende.]

Clementia of Poitiers, by Wikipedia

Traditionally, Clementia is seen as the wife of Conrad I of Luxembourg . However, there are only a few vague indications for this:

  • There is a contemporary charter from which it could be concluded that Conrad's wife is from Poitou ;
  • Conrad's wife was Lady of Longwy , and that property she might have acquired through her presumed mother Ermesinde of Lorraine ;
  • Conrad's wife is called Clementia.

However, given the date of her daughter's birth, Clementia could have been born no later than about 1045 and died only in 1142, she would have become very old. There is therefore a theory that Conrad would have had two wives:

  • Probably Ermesinde of Lorraine, who was then not the wife of William VII of Aquitaine, lady of Longwy;
  • Clementia van Gleiberg, who is mentioned as wife of Conrad.

On the other hand, mentioning Clementia as Lady of Gleiberg need not conflict with a possible Aquitanian ancestry: if Gleiberg was already Luxembourg's property at the time of her marriage, this may have been her dowry.

  • Clementia (van Gleiberg) is said to have remarried to Gerard I van Gelre . However, the authenticity of the deed stating this is the subject of fierce debate.

Koenraad and his wife (s) had the following children:

  • Mathilde (born ca. 1060), married to Godfried van de Bliesgau
  • Hendrik
  • Rudolf († 1099), Abbot of Saint-Vannes in Verdun (from 1075 until his death) and of the Altmünster in Luxembourg, from the foundation of that abbey
  • Conrad
  • Ermesinde
  • Willem
  • Adalbero († Antioch , 1098), Archdeacon of Metz , took part in the First Crusade and was attacked during the siege of Antioch while playing dice with a lady. Adalbero was killed and the lady was taken into town. Their heads were shot back with a catapult.

Links

Sources

  • "Clementia of Aquitaine (Family Card and Person Sheet)". Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 24 May 1999. Retrieved 23 June 2020.
  • Jackman, Donald C. (2012). The Kleeberg Fragment of the Gleiberg County.
  • Gades, John A. (1951). Luxembourg in the Middle Ages.
  • "Gerald I de Wassenberg". homepages.rpi.edu. Retrieved 26 August 2020.
  • Black-Veldtrup, Mechthild: Kaiserin Agnes (1043-1077) Source-critical studies
  • Böhlau Verlag Cologne 1995, page 59,321, 370
  • D ouglas David C: Wilhelm the Conqueror Duke of Normandy. Diederichs Verlag Munich 1994 page 74.78 ???
  • E hlers Joachim / M üller Heribert / Sch envy miller Bernd: The French kings of the Middle Ages.
  • From Odo to Charles VIII. 888-1498. Verlag CH Beck Munich 1996 Page 104
  • G locker Winfrid: The relatives of the Ottonians and their significance in politics. Böhlau Verlag Cologne Vienna 1989 VIII, 35 page 338
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Clémence von Wassenberg, De Limbourg Arlon's Timeline

1060
1060
Poitiers, Vienne, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, France
1075
1075
Trier, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
1080
1080
1082
1082
Wassenberg, Rheinland, Prussia
1086
1086
Wassenberg, Koeln, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany
1088
1088
Wassenberg, Rheinland, Prussia
1090
1090
Geldern, North Rhine-Westphalia, Duitsland
1142
January 4, 1142
Age 82
Wassenberg, Cologne, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
1142
Age 82
Wassenberg Wald Friedhof Waldfeucht, Landkreis Heinsberg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany