Sir William Wade

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Sir William Gildea Wade (Wade/Waad), M.P., Lieutenant of the Tower of London.

Also Known As: "Waad", "William Waad"
Birthdate:
Birthplace: Yorkshire, England (United Kingdom)
Death: October 21, 1623 (76-77)
Battles Hall, Mauden, Essex, England (United Kingdom)
Place of Burial: Manuden, Uttlesford District, Essex, England
Immediate Family:

Son of Armigel Wade, M.P. and Alice Wade (Patton)
Husband of Anne Wade and Ann Wade
Father of Arminger Wade; Jane Ware; Anna Elizabeth Mowry; William Wade V; James Wade and 3 others
Brother of Thomas Wade, MP; Richard Wade; Joyce Wade and Ann Wade

Occupation: Lieut. Gov., Tower of London; Chief Examiner of Jesuits, Clerk of the council, diplomatist, and lieutenant of the Tower
Managed by: Holly Gaye Peterson
Last Updated:

About Sir William Wade

Family and Education b. c.1546,1 1st s. of Armagil Waad of Belsize House and his 1st w. Alice, da. of Richard Patten alias Wainfleet of London, Clothworker and wid. of Thomas Serle (admon. 11 Jan. 1541) of Essex and London, Butcher; bro. of Thomas†.2 educ. G. Inn 1571.3 m. (1) lic. 15 Jan. 1586, Anne (d.1589), da. and coh. of Owen Waller of Battles Hall and London, Fishmonger, 1s. d.v.p.;4 (2) by 1597, Anne, 1s. 8da.5 suc. fa. 1568;6 kntd. 20 May 1603.7 d. 25 Oct. 1623.8 sig. W[illiam] Waad.

Offices Held

Servant to 1st Lord Burghley (Sir William Cecil†) by 1577;9 agent, Denmark 1582,10 Holy Roman Empire 1583,11 Spain 1584, France 1585, 1587,12 Low Countries 1585.13

Clerk of PC 1584-1613;14 commr. to search for Catholic traitors 1594-5;15 muster-master, Low Countries by 1600-16;16 member, High Commission, Canterbury prov. 1601-11;17 muster-master-gen. by ?1599-at least 1620;18 lt. Tower of London 1605-13;19 recvr. and overseer, Cheque of Ire. bef. 1606;20 commr. enforcement of starch monopoly, 1607-9.21

J.p. Mdx. c.1591-d., Essex c.1612-16, 1617-d.;22 commr. bankruptcy, London 1595,23 oyer and terminer, Marshalsea 1597,24 London 1601-13, 1621-d.,25 Mdx. 1601-13, 1614-d.,26 Verge 1604-13,27 sewers, Mdx. 1600, 1604-6, 1610, 1620,28 London 1605-6, 1611,29 Herts. 1607, 1609, 1615, 1618, Essex 1618,30 treason indictments, Mdx. 1603, forfeited estates 1603,31 charitable uses 1605,32 gaol delivery, London 1605-11,33 musters, Mdx. 1608, 1616,34 subsidy 1608, 1621-2,35 inquiry, London and Surr. 1608,36 aid, Mdx. 1609,37 swans, Thames valley 1609, New River, Herts. and Mdx. 1610,38 annoyances, Surr. 1611, Mdx. 1613, highway repairs, Essex 1622.39

Member, Spanish Co. 1604,40 Somers Is. Co. 1612-14; cttee. Virg. Co. 1606.41

Biography According to the memorial inscription which Waad drafted for his father Armagil, his family originated in Yorkshire. Since both men obtained their own grants of arms, they were probably of comparatively humble stock. Armagil attracted early attention with a voyage to America, and served as a clerk of the Privy Council under Henry VIII and Edward VI. Employed by Elizabeth I as a diplomatic agent, he also helped to muster troops for the 1562 intervention in France. He died in 1568, leaving Waad a small estate in Buckinghamshire, Kent and Middlesex, including the lease of Belsize House, Hampstead.42 Waad himself, who relied heavily on Cecil patronage throughout much of his career, travelled extensively on the Continent between the mid-1570s and 1587, initially gathering information for Burghley and Sir Francis Walsingham†, and then graduating to formal diplomatic missions.43 As a clerk of the Council from 1584, he continued to act vigorously in defence of the Elizabethan regime, and played a significant role in foiling the Babington and Lopez plots.44 A committed Protestant, Waad was known for his dogged pursuit of Catholics, especially priests, whose activities he monitored through his intelligence network.45 In the latter stages of the reign he became heavily involved in mustering and supplying troops in Ireland and the Low Countries.46 He sat in three Elizabethan parliaments, in 1601 as a nominee of Sir Robert Cecil†.47

At the outset of James’s reign, Waad was confirmed in his Privy Council role and, like the other clerks, received a knighthood.48 Despite his advancing years, he took an active part in investigating the Bye and Main plots in 1603, though apparently not to the extent of forging confessions, as the 11th Lord Cobham (Henry Brooke†) alleged.49 In the following year, with Cecil’s help, Waad secured grants of duchy of Lancaster lands worth at least £60 p.a.50 Nevertheless, by the spring of 1605 his standing at Court was in marked decline. Samuel Calvert thought him to be ‘almost in the predicament of other old servants, that are in a manner rather neglected, than in the least measure countenanced’.51

This situation was transformed shortly afterwards by the death of Sir George Hervey*, the lieutenant of the Tower of London. In August 1605 Cecil obtained the lieutenancy for Waad, and then in October nominated him for a parliamentary seat at West Looe, also vacant since Hervey’s death, after an abortive bid to place him at Bere Alston.52 The discovery of the Gunpowder Plot both postponed Waad’s parliamentary duties, and presented him with his first major emergency as lieutenant. Although he failed to prevent the death from natural causes of one of his inmates, the conspirator Francis Tresham, he made considerable efforts to extract information from Guy Fawkes, and was especially assiduous in investigating Henry Garnet, the Jesuit implicated in the Plot.53 Indeed, these events confirmed Waad’s worst suspicions about the Catholic threat. He had been monitoring subversive pamphlets and rumoured conspiracies even before the Plot was revealed, and during the next few years he continued to search out Jesuits and seminary priests.54

Appropriately, Waad’s first nomination in the 1605-6 session of Parliament was to a committee appointed to prepare for a conference with the Lords on recusancy (3 February). Three days later he was included in a select committee to consider measures to address the threat posed by English soldiers fighting for Spain in the Netherlands. On 30 Apr. he was also named to the committee for the Gunpowder plotters’ attainder bill. His position at the Tower was reflected in his inclusion on a bill committee concerned with counterfeiting, since he was responsible for guarding the Mint (28 February). Moreover, he was appointed on 10 Apr. to search for records at the Tower. As a member of High Commission, he was an obvious choice to attend a conference on church courts (10 Apr.), while his Privy Council role may explain his nomination to the bill committee concerned with William Davison’s† King’s Bench clerkship (20 March). It is unclear why he was named on 6 Feb. to the committee stage of a road improvements bill.55

The third parliamentary session saw Waad’s duties increase. Appointed to the committee for privileges, he was nominated on 23 Mar. 1607 to consider how business might be conducted in the Speaker’s absence, and on 19 June to locate references in the Commons Journal to the privileges of the House. He was also named to the select committee for handling the Members’ collection (9 June).56 As lieutenant of the Tower he was instructed by the House first to confine and then release Sir Christopher Piggott*, who had offended the king by his remarks about the Scots (16 and 28 February). Waad’s prominence in London explains his inclusion in bill committees concerned with buildings around the capital, the relief of poor London curriers, and grants to the City’s companies and corporation (21 Nov. 1606, 8 Dec., 30 Apr. 1607, 4 May). A nomination on 28 Feb. to help consider a petition about Spanish ill-treatment of London merchants neatly combined two of his main pre-occupations.57 Waad’s government role probably encouraged his appointment on 29 Nov. 1606 to a committee to prepare for a conference about the Union, and on 13 Dec. to a legislative committee concerned with a Crown grant to Sir Roger Aston*. His remaining committee nominations covered the foundation of a Gloucestershire school, drunkenness, bastardy, and the estates of the Evelyn and Selby families (26 Nov., 8 Dec., 28 Feb. 1607, 30 Apr., 7 May).58

In the fourth session, Waad’s role at the Tower once again coloured his committee appointments. Four times he was dispatched there to consult parliamentary records (30 Apr., 1 May, 16 June and 10 July 1610), while four of the legislative committees to which he was named dealt with trading or court jurisdictions in the London area (20 and 23 Feb., 29 Mar. and 19 April).59 As in the previous session, Waad was nominated to help to arrange distribution of the Members’ collection (18 July). His membership of the House also brought with it personal benefits, as he was twice awarded parliamentary privilege, once on 8 May in relation to a lawsuit, and again ten days later for one of his servants.60 On 5 July he was appointed to examine allegations of soft treatment of recusants, a situation which he would scarcely have condoned when he had only recently secured a grant of the forfeited possessions of any Catholics whom he helped to convict. Waad was heavily involved in the Commons’ efforts to punish Sir Stephen Procter, who had been abusing government commissions for personal gain (8 Mar., 15 May and 19 July), though he was also named to a bill committee which dealt with vexatious suits against magistrates.61 His remaining committee nominations covered bills ranging from the confirmation of Magna Carta (3 Mar.) and an elucidation of the poor law (21 Apr.), through the regulation of roads, alehouses and private contracts (30 and 31 Mar., 19 Apr.), to non-residence of provosts, bastardy, and the Pleydall family’s estates (16 Apr., 16 May and 14 June). No record survives of his activities during the fifth session.62

Waad’s financial position during the time he sat in Parliament is difficult to establish. He must have been fairly wealthy to become one of the first directors of the newly founded Virginia Company in 1606, even allowing for his contacts within government. This was no less true six years later, when he joined the consortium which purchased the Somers Islands from the Virginia Company.63 In the meantime, however, he assiduously pursued the arrears owing to him for his task of supplying troops to Ireland, and in 1607 complained to Cecil that his expenses as lieutenant were outstripping his income.64 It was doubtless with some hope of personal profit that, around this time, Waad became involved in managing the earl of Northampton’s farm of the imposition on starch, though he seems to have been less active in this business than some of his fellow commissioners.65

Waad’s management of the Tower was brought seriously into question by the embarrassing escape of William Seymour* in June 1611. The king alleged that the fortress was ‘used now more like a house of hospitality and entertainment of company than of restraint’, and the Council warned that the regime there must be tightened up, not least because Arbella Stuart was shortly to be confined to the Tower in place of her husband.66 However, these criticisms of Waad’s performance took no account of the fact that the lieutenant had to strike a difficult balance. Some of his more high-profile prisoners, such as (Sir) Walter Ralegh†, were liable to cause him trouble if dissatisfied with their treatment, and indeed he was overruled when he tried to prevent the 9th earl of Northumberland from bringing in his own food supplies. When he had first queried how he was expected to handle such notables in 1605, the Council itself admitted that James I permitted a more relaxed regime than had his predecessors. Waad did make some efforts to reduce unauthorized access to the Tower, and indeed found himself in trouble in 1607 for obstructing an Admiralty judge who tried to summon a prisoner before him without first obtaining clearance from the Council. Nevertheless, the allegations of laxness returned to haunt him in 1613.67

On 21 Apr. that year, Sir Thomas Overbury was sent to the Tower, to be kept a close prisoner. About a week later Waad heard reports that he was to be replaced as lieutenant, and on 6 May he was summoned before the Council and summarily dismissed on the grounds of ‘more loose government and liberty given to the prisoners than was used in the queen’s time’, especially with regard to Overbury. The Tower warders were informed that the king was merely relieving the burden on an aged servant, but rumours immediately swept London that Waad had committed some serious offence, such as theft from Lady Arbella.68 Conscious of his disgrace, Waad disposed of his Council clerkship to Sir Francis Cottington* shortly afterwards, although he continued to fulfil his role in military administration.69 By early 1615 he was investigating the management of a glass patent at the Council’s request, and his conduct as lieutenant was in a manner vindicated by the Overbury murder inquiry later that year. Waad cooperated fully with this investigation, asserting with some justification that he had been removed from office because the strict watch which he kept on Overbury was protecting the fallen favourite from his enemies.70

Although as late as 1622 the Council was calling on his services in minor matters, Waad seems to have retired during his final years to his estate in Essex, which he had acquired through his first marriage and where he built a house called Battles Hall.71 His will, drawn up on 1 Apr. 1618, lists a number of properties in London, Middlesex, and Essex, besides his duchy of Lancaster lands. Despite this evidence of worldly success, he was anxious about the future welfare of his wife and children, ‘who are entering into a troubled sea of this latter age ... full of all vexations and unfaithful dealing, of all vice and treachery’. His heir was his only surviving son, a minor, whom he wished to be brought up ‘in the fear of God and in learning’. Waad requested a simple funeral at Manuden in the event that he died at Battles Hall, which he did in October 1623 at the advanced age of 77. He was the last of his immediate family to sit in Parliament.72

Ref Volumes: 1604-1629 Author: Paul Hunneyball Notes 1. Waad was aged 77 in 1623: P. Morant, Hist. and Antiqs. of Essex, ii. 620. 2. Mdx. Peds. (Harl. Soc. lxv), 33; PROB 11/25, f. 278; 11/28, f. 154r-v. 3. GI Admiss. 4. Bp. of London Mar. Lics. 1520-1610 ed. G.J. Armytage (Harl. Soc. xxv), 145; Mdx. Peds. 33; GL, ms 7673/1; Morant, ii. 620; GI Admiss. 5. IGI Essex; PROB 11/142, ff. 390-1. The statements in HP Commons, 1558-1603, iii. 560 and Oxford DNB, lvi. 628 that Anne was the da. of Sir Humphrey Browne appear to be unfounded. 6. Morant, ii. 620. 7. Shaw, Knights of Eng. ii. 109. 8. Morant, ii. 620. 9. CSP For. 1575-7, p. 475. 10. HMC Ancaster, 15. 11. CSP For. 1583, p. 397. 12. Ibid. 1584-5, pp. 207, 348; 1586-8, p. 189. 13. CSP Dom. 1581-90, p. 262. 14. C66/1245. 15. C66/1417; 66/1435. 16. APC, 1599-1600, p. 667; HMC De L’Isle and Dudley, v. 382. 17. R.G. Usher, Rise and Fall of High Commission, 359. 18. HMC Var. i. 69, 90. 19. HMC 8th Rep. 87; APC, 1613-14, p. 11. 20. CSP Dom. Addenda, 1623-5, p. 537. 21. CSP Dom. 1603-10, pp. 390, 419, 441, 470, 536. 22. Hatfield House, ms 278; C66/1898; 66/2285; C231/4, ff. 14, 51. 23. C66/1446. 24. C231/1, f. 59v. 25. C181/1, f. 11; 181/2, f. 178v; 181/3, ff. 21v, 102v. 26. C181/1, f. 13v; 181/2, ff. 177v, 218v; 181/3, f. 100v. 27. C181/1, f. 93v; 181/2, f. 180. 28. C66/1541; C181/1, f. 88; 181/2, ff. 19v, 128; 181/3, f. 18v. 29. C181/1, f. 115; 181/2, ff. 19v, 153. 30. C181/2, ff. 50, 90, 229v, 317, 318. 31. C181/1, ff. 66v, 72v. 32. C93/2/15. 33. C181/1, f. 127; 181/2, f. 157v. 34. Add. 11402, f. 142; APC, 1615-16, p. 692. 35. SP14/31/1; C212/22/20-1. 36. C181/2, f. 70. 37. E179/283. 38. C181/2, ff. 89, 126v. 39. C181/2, ff. 142, 199; 181/3, f. 68v. 40. T.K. Rabb, Enterprise and Empire, 395. 41. A. Brown, Genesis of US, 594, 748, 1040. 42. Morant, ii. 620; Mdx. Peds. 33; HP Commons, 1509-58, iii. 532; PROB 11/52, f. 38. 43. HMC Hatfield, ii. 254, 313; xvii. 368; CSP For. 1575-7, p. 356; CSP Dom. 1581-90, p. 12. 44. HMC Rutland, i. 204-5; CSP Dom. 1591-4, p. 428. 45. HMC Hodgkin, 270-1; HMC Rutland, i. 369; CSP Dom. Addenda, 1580-1625, p. 437. 46. HMC Rutland, i. 358; HMC Var. i. 69-70; CSP Carew, 1601-3, p. 373. 47. HP Commons, 1558-1603, iii. 560. 48. APC, 1601-4, p. 497; Shaw, ii. 109. 49. HMC 7th Rep. 591; CSP Dom. 1603-10, pp. 27, 35, 38; HMC Hatfield, xv. 228; Ct. of Jas. I ed. G. Goodman, i. 67. 50. CSP Dom. 1603-10, pp. 31, 64, 91; C66/1648. 51. Winwood’s Memorials, ii. 54, 57. 52. HMC Hatfield, xvii. 368, 445; HMC 8th Rep. i. 87. 53. HMC Hatfield, xvii. 479, 553; xviii. 97, 138; CSP Dom. 1603-10, p. 239, 246-7, 269, 273, 296, 306, 308-9. 54. HMC Hatfield, xvii. 101, 362-3; xviii. 210; xxi. 100; CSP Dom. 1603-10, p. 515; HMC Downshire, ii. 367; Lansd. 153, f. 71. 55. CJ, i. 263a, 264a-b, 275b, 287b, 296a-b, 303a. 56. Ibid. 354a, 381b, 385b. 57. Ibid. 318a, 328b, 336a, 344b, 365a, 368b. 58. Ibid. 325a, 326b, 328b, 330b, 344a, 365a, 370b. 59. Ibid. 397b, 399a, 416a, 419a, 422b, 423a, 440a, 447b; Lansd. 486, ff. 138v-9. 60. CJ, i. 426a, 429a, 451b. 61. Ibid. 408a, 415b, 428b, 446b, 452b; C66/1826/73. 62. CJ, i. 404b, 416b, 417a, 418b, 419a-b, 429a, 438b. 63. Brown, 594, 1040. 64. CSP Dom. Addenda, 1623-5, p. 537; HMC Hatfield, xix. 81. 65. HMC Sackville, i. 155; CSP Dom. 1603-10, p. 419; A.F. Upton, Sir Arthur Ingram, 19-20. 66. HMC 8th Rep. 88; CSP Dom. 1611-18, pp. 42, 53. 67. HMC Hatfield, xvii. 377-9, 443, 548; xviii. 244; xix. 373; HMC 6th Rep. 229; CSP Dom. 1603-10, p. 452. 68. SP14/81/84; 14/84/10; HMC Downshire, iv. 105; CSP Dom. 1611-18, p. 183. 69. CSP Dom. 1611-18, p. 198; HMC Downshire, iv. 240; APC, 1613-14, pp. 449, 478, 525. 70. APC, 1615-16, pp. 16, 95; SP14/81/84; CSP Dom. 1611-18, pp. 314, 323, 336; S.R. Gardiner, Hist. Eng. 1603-42, ii. 179. 71. APC, 1621-3, p. 176; Morant, ii. 620. 72. PROB 11/142, ff. 390-2; Morant, ii. 620



Birth: 1546

 Calais, Dordogne, Aquitaine, France Marriage:	1591
 , , , England Death:	Oct 21 1623
 Battles Hall, Essex, England

http://www.myheritage.com/research/collection-10109/wikitree?itemId...


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wade_(English_politician) Sir William Wade Find a Grave Memorial MEMORIAL ID 143199942 Wade was the eldest son of Armagil Wade, the traveller, who sailed with a party of adventurers for North America in 1536, later, one of the clerks of the privy council in London and a member of parlia

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Sir William Wade was from 1605-1613 the

Sir William Wade was from 1605-1613 the Governor of the Tower of London duringthe "Gunpowder Plot" of 5 November 1605. He was listed on the "Second VirginiaCharter" dated 23 May 1609 and was "elected council for said company of adventurers and planters in Virginia." He was knighted by King James on 2 May 1603. Alawyer educated at Grays Inn (1571). After graduation he was placed in a diplomatic roll. On May 1584. he was sent to induce Mary, "Queen of Scots" to come toterms with Elizabeth. In 1586 he played a prominent role in seizing Mary Stuart's papers which implcated her in the Babington Plot. The next year his final diplomatic mission to France was to explain her execution. He later became the Chief Examiner of Jesuits and persecutor of Catholics. His first wife Anne Waller died giving birth to his son Armagil. With his seond wife, Anne Browne hehad one son and five daughters. Father: Armagil Wade b: 1514 in YorkshireCounty, England Marriage 1 Ann Waller Children Jane Wade b: 1595 Armagil Wade Marriage 2 Anne Browne Children

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GIVN William

SURN Wase _UID 4DF4FC302B7A ===
GIVN William SURN Wase _UID 4DF4FC302B7A2145950A1BD8B168A44E15A7 DATE 20 Jul 2005

Sir William Wade was from 1605-1613 the

Sir William Wade was from 1605-1613 the Governor of the Tower of London during the "Gunpowder Plot" of 5 November 1605. He was listed on the "Second Virginia Charter" dated 23 May 1609 and was "elected council for said company of adventurers and planters in Virginia." He was knighted by King James on 2 May 1603. A lawyer educated at Grays Inn (1571). After graduation he was placed in a diplomatic roll. On May 1584. he was sent to induce Mary, "Queen of Scots" to come to terms with Elizabeth. In 1586 he played a prominent role in seizing Mary Stuart's papers which implcated her in the Babington Plot. The next year his final diplomatic mission to France was to explain her execution. He later became the Chief Examiner of Jesuits and persecutor of Catholics. His first wife Anne Waller died giving birth to his son Armagil. With his seond wife, Anne Browne he had one son and five daughters.

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926K-GLN William Wade in entry for Abigal Wade, "England, Essex Parish Registers, 1538-1997" "England, Essex Parish Registers, 1538-1997," database, <i>FamilySearch</i> (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XK8B-M4S : 18 July 2017), William Wade in entry for Abigal Wade, 21 Jan 1597, Christening; citing , Manuden, Essex, England, Essex Record O https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XK8B-M4S


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William Gildea Wade House of Parliament of London Governor of the Tower. ALL THIS AS HIS NAME IS INAPPROPRIATE.

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Sir William Wade was from 1605-1613 the ===
Sir William Wade was from 1605-1613 the Governor of the Tower of London duringthe "Gunpowder Plot" of 5 November 1605. He was listed on the "Second VirginiaCharter" dated 23 May 1609 and was "elected council for said company of adventurers and planters in Virginia." He was knighted by King James on 2 May 1603. Alawyer educated at Grays Inn (1571). After graduation he was placed in a diplomatic roll. On May 1584. he was sent to induce Mary, "Queen of Scots" to come toterms with Elizabeth. In 1586 he played a prominent role in seizing Mary Stuart's papers which implcated her in the Babington Plot. The next year his final diplomatic mission to France was to explain her execution. He later became the Chief Examiner of Jesuits and persecutor of Catholics. His first wife Anne Waller died giving birth to his son Armagil. With his seond wife, Anne Browne hehad one son and five daughters. Father: Armagil Wade b: 1514 in YorkshireCounty, England Marriage 1 Ann Waller Children Jane Wade b: 1595 Armagil Wade Marriage 2 Anne Browne Children

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(21) dead ===
(21) dead

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GIVN William===
SURN Wase _UID 4DF4FC302B7A ===
GIVN William SURN Wase _UID 4DF4FC302B7A2145950A1BD8B168A44E15A7 DATE 20 Jul 2005

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Sir William Waad and his two wives named Anne ===
"Sir William was first married in 1586 to Anne (1571-1589), daughter of Owen Waller, a citizen of London . . . . She died in 1589 in childbirth. The record does not state whether this was the birth of her only son Armagil, but it can be assumed that this is so. Sir William married again, about 1599: his second wife was also Anne, a daughter of Sir Humphrey Browne. The second Anne had one son, James (1606?-1671), and five daughters. Sir William, a shareholder in the Virginia Company, died in 1623, at his Manor of Battailes, Essex, October 21."

See "The Wades the Histpry of a Family" https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=wu.89062512942&view=1up&seq=18

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Sir William Wade was from 1605-1613 the ===
Sir William Wade was from 1605-1613 the Governor of the Tower of London during the "Gunpowder Plot" of 5 November 1605. He was listed on the "Second Virginia Charter" dated 23 May 1609 and was "elected council for said company of adventurers and planters in Virginia." He was knighted by King James on 2 May 1603. A lawyer educated at Grays Inn (1571). After graduation he was placed in a diplomatic roll. On May 1584. he was sent to induce Mary, "Queen of Scots" to come to terms with Elizabeth. In 1586 he played a prominent role in seizing Mary Stuart's papers which implcated her in the Babington Plot. The next year his final diplomatic mission to France was to explain her execution. He later became the Chief Examiner of Jesuits and persecutor of Catholics. His first wife Anne Waller died giving birth to his son Armagil. With his seond wife, Anne Browne he had one son and five daughters.

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6/5/2020 = Working on Wade Line ===
Greetings to All Family Researchers on the Wade (Waad) families. I am Bonnie Harris, a professional historian and researcher. I am a direct descendant of the Hamptons of Virginia and have been researching how the Hampton and the Wade families in early Colonial Virginia connect. I can positively say that I am a direct descendant of Margaret Wade, daughter of a James Wade but from there back it gets murky, with existing attempts to connect this Wade line to Edward Wade I who was the first to come over to Virginia on the ship “Paule” in July 1635. And then there are attempts to connect him to Sir William Wade (Waad), stockholder in the Virginia Company and a very famous guy. PROBLEM with that, is that Sir William only had ONE surviving son of his two marriages, and that was a James Wade, not to be confused with the James Wade mentioned above. SSOoooo… Edward cannot be the son of Sir William Wade. He COULD be the son of Sir William’s ONLY surviving brother, Thomas Wade (b. 1547, d. 1594) as I have found no information for Thomas regarding a family. Or Edward could be descended from an Arthur Wade in England, b. about 1550-70, who had a son Christopher Wade, a line that looks to be unrelated to the Sir William Wade family. OR Edward could somehow be related to Armagil Wade extended family members, Armagil being the father of Sir William Wade. Descendants of Edward Wade claim that he maintained he was descended from Armagil Wade. THENnnnnn…. there is ANOTHER Wade that shows up in Virginia Clerk and Court records in the 1640s, an Armiger Wade, who will become a Burgess in Virginia Colonial Government in 1656. I have no idea yet where he is supposed to belong, except that he too is claimed to be descended from Armagil Wade, father of Sir William Wade, BUT he cannot be the son of William Wade either. I’M WORKING ON IT. So consequently, I have been into lots of great old genealogy records for Armagil and William and working on the Wade line. Be patient with me as I edit and merge duplications and erroneous connections. The Wade Immigrants to British Colonies in America 1. Following Names, Dates, Ships, and destinations of departure taken from The Original Lists of Persons…1600-1700 by John Camden Hotten. a. Passengers out of London, 1635: i. Robert Wade, age 35, boards the “Paul” April 3 to St. Christophers (West Indies). pg. 50. ii. Nic[olas] Wade, age 19, boards the “Faulcon” April 13 to Barbados (West Indies). pg. 63. iii. George Wade, age 16, boards the “Mathew” May 21 to St Christophers (West Indies). pg. 82. iv. Edward Wade, age 24, boards the “Paul” July 6 to Virginia. pg. 103. v. George Wade, age 19, boards the “Primrose” July 27 to Virginia. pg. 115. vi. John Wade, age 21, boards the “Constance” October 24 to Virginia. pg. 136. b. Passengers by the Commissions and Soldiers According to the Statute, Christmas 1631 to Christmas 1632 i. Jonathan Wade, 22 June 1632, transported to New England. [no age, no ship named]. pg. 150. ii. William Wade, of Bodmin, age 33, 1634, Passengers in the “Robert Bonaventure” for St. Christophers (West Indies). pg. 153. c. Bound for New England, 20 March 1635 i. Richard Wade of Simstuly [sic ~ probably Simsbury, abbrev. for Symondsbury], 60 yrs. old. cooper. pg. 300. ii. Elizabeth Wade, his wife, 6? yrs old iii. Dinah Wade, his daughter, 22 yrs old d. Parish Registers ~ Burials i. Hannah, wife of John Wade, 22 April 1678 2. Following excerpt from The Wade Genealogy : being some account of the origin of the name, and of the lost folkstory of the famous hero, Wada, particulars and pedigrees of famous Englishmen of the name : and genealogies of the families of Wade of Massachusetts and New Jersey, to which are added many miscellaneous pedigrees. by Wade, Stuart C. (Stuart Charles), d. 1904. a. “The was the age of Colonization in Virginia, New England, and New Jersey. It was but natural that the namesakes of ‘the English Columbus’ Armigel Wade, should have considerable part in this great emigration. Accordingly we find, in Virginia, form 1646 or earlier, the names of Wades, some even bearing the peculiar Christian name of Armiger, and so undoubted descendants of the explorer. In New England, the record dates from 1632, when Jonathan, Nathaniel, and Nicolas Wade, wealthy yeomen of the English county of Norfolk, settled around the present site of Boston, Massachusetts. In New Jersey, the family honor was sustained by Benjamin Wade, a clothier, who was for a while in Jamaica, Long Island, proceeding thence to Elizabethtown, in New Jersey, where he was one of the earliest settlers.” pg. 61 b. “in 1624, Willian Wade was supplying water-casks to ships bound for Surat [Barbery Coast, Africa], and on October 16. 1624, Robert Wade died on the Charles River in Virginia, accidently shot in the arm.” pg. 57. c. “Let us look at the facts at Yorktown in Virginia …. In the county records a Henry Wade appears as early as 1646. There is a will of Armiger Wade who lived in York county in 1644, and was burgess in 1657, and the Clerk of the Cunty and Circuit Courts reports the frequent occurrence of the names of Armiger Wade, Edward Wade, Thomas Wade, William Wade, John Wade, Richard Wade, James Wade, Joseph Wade, and Mildred Wade. These, as surely as human speculation can be correct, were descendants of that worthy Armigel Wade of England, who was no inconsiderable figure in the history of his own land.” pg. 84. d. “Sir William Waad, subscribed £75 to the funds of the Virginia Company, and actually paid £144, 10s. He was one of those who purchased the Somers Island (the modern Bermudas) from the Virginia Company on November 25, 1612, and resigned them to the Crown of England, November 23, 1614. How important a factor he was in the early colonization of Virginia fully appears from a perusal of Alexander Brown’s Genesis of the United States, and the Calendar of the State Papers. We find that Zuniga, the Spanish Ambassador at the English Court, seldom forwarded a report to his master, without referring to the acts or sayings “of the Knight Wed,” as he styled Sir William Waad, who was a Member of Council for Virginia in 1606, and a member of Council for the Virginia Company in 1609.” pg. 113. e. “Considering and dealing with the various families of Wade, we now reach the notable and numerous family of Wade in New Jersey, and afterwards, Ohio. This branch dates, so far as any researches in American records can disclose, from Benjamin Wade, born in 1646, who came from Jamaica in Long Island, New York, about 1675, and settled at Wade’s Farms or Connecticut Farms … an early ancestor, Robert Wade, born before 1727, who is said to have been captured by the French in the colonial wars, and died, a prisoner of war, in a fortress of sunny France, while Annias Wade was also a soldier in the French and Indian War, 1759 … From the New Jersey records, … a list of no less than twenty-one members of the family … fighting for freedom and all that liberty implied. They range in rank from Major Nehemiah Wade, who died in the service from exposure, to the simple private soldier who … served in the New Jersey line until Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown. … Major William Wade was a prominent officer in the United States Army in the War of 1812. … Then the pleasant places of Ohio began to attract the Wades … Columbia, in Hamilton County, Ohio, commemorates on a centennial inscription, Thomas C. Wade, of this family, one of the first boatload of pioneers, landing there in 1788, and founding the Baptist Church, the first Protestant place of worship organized in the then, new North West.” pg. 228. 3. From “History of Parliament” online at www.historyofparliamentonline.org: a. In the entry for Sir William Waad in the History of the Parliament (see sources) it is disclosed that according to Sir William's will, which was drawn up 1 April 1618, Sir William had only 1 surviving son, which had to have been the only son of his second wife, Anne (Browne), James Wade. Sir William's first son, Armagil Wade II, son by his first wife, Anne Waller, had to have pre-deceased him. At the time the will was drawn, April 1, 1618, his only surviving son was still a minor - so it could not have been Armagil II, who in 1618 would have been 29 years old had he been alive, so he was deceased before 1618. Sir Wm's will also discloses that 8 daughters were born to him by his 2nd wife. b. According to Bio of Armagil Waad I in the History of Parliament, he had 17 children by his first wife, Alice Patten Searle, and 3 children by his second wife, Anne Marbury Bradley. Of these 20 children, all 3 by his second wife pre-deceased him, and 11 of the 17 from his 1st wife. Of his 20 children, 6 survived their father, the oldest being Sir William Waad and a younger son Thomas named in Armagil's will (drawn 1561). It is therefore reasonable to presume that the Edward Wade I and Armiger Wade, who claimed to be descended from Armagil Waad I WERE NOT descended from Sir William, but from the other surviving son of Armagil's, Thomas. 4. National Archives Ships List – American Genealogical Research Society. Edward Wade Immigrated from England on board the ship Paule in July , 1635 a. “Will of Edward Wade, pages 11-13, 9 Nov 1675. Proved 24, Apr 1677 at Court for York County, Edward Wade of Hampton Parish in New York CO. TO be buried in the orchard I now live by my family. To may son, William Wade, 100 acres of land in Hampton Parish. To my grandson, Samuel Bond, 150 acres at the head of Ware Creek in New Kent County, but if he should die without issue, then to my daughter Jane the wife of Jeremiah Laundy. To my wife Jane, two servants, William Greystoke and Anne Elmore, and my old grey gelding. To William Wade, my son, furniture and one servant, John Constant. To my grandchild Edward Wade, one mare foal, my mare Rose. To my daughter Dorothy, the wife of Thomas Huncocke [sic] the first mare foal that my old mare shall bring forth. To my son Edward Wade one cow between

GEDCOM Note

Sir William Wade Find a Grave Memorial MEMORIAL ID 143199942 Wade was the eldest son of Armagil Wade, the traveller, who sailed with a party of adventurers for North America in 1536, later, one of the clerks of the privy council in London and a member of parlia

GEDCOM Note

Life Sketch ===
Sir William Wade (or Waad) (1546 – 21 October 1623) was an English statesman and diplomat, and Lieutenant of the Tower of London.

William Wade was the eldest son of Armagil Wade, the traveller, who sailed with a party of adventurers for North America in 1536, later, one of the clerks of the privy council in London and a member of parliament, and his second wife, Alice (Patten) Searle.

Both his parents died in 1568, and Wade succeeded to the family property, being his father's oldest living son, as all 3 children by his first wife, Anne Marbury (Merbury) predeceased him. In 1571 William was admitted a student of Gray's Inn, and a few years later, doubtless with a view to entering the service of the government, he began travelling on the continent.

In July 1576 Waad was living in Paris and frequently supplied political information to William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, whose "servant" he is described as being. He claimed "familiar acquaintance" with the celebrated French publicist Jean Bodin, from whom he seems to have derived some of the news he forwarded to Burghley. In the autumn of 1576 Amias Paulet took Wade to Blois. During the winter of 1578–79 he was in Italy, from where he forwarded to Burghley reports on its political condition. From Venice in April 1579 he sent Burghley fifty of the rarest kinds of seeds in Italy. In May he was in Florence, and in February 1579/80 he was living in Strasbourg. In the following April he was employed on a delicate mission in Paris by Sir Henry Cobham.

Among appointments in London, Waad undertook a number of ambassadorial missions, in 1580 to Portugal; then in 1581 he became secretary to Sir Francis Walsingham and in 1583 he was appointed as one of the clerks of the Privy Council. In April of that year he was sent to Vienna to discuss the differences between the Hanseatic League and English merchants abroad, and in July he accompanied Lord Willoughby on his embassy to Denmark to invest the king with the insignia of the Garter, and to negotiate an agreement on mercantile affairs.

In January 1583–4 he was sent to Madrid to explain the expulsion from England of the Spanish ambassador, Mendoza. He arrived in March, but Phillip II refused all his requests for an interview and ordered him out of Spain, with an intimation that he was fortunate to escape to liberty. He was back in England on 12 April, and with his return diplomatic relations between England and Spain ceased. In the same month Waad was sent to Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots, to induce her to come to terms with Elizabeth, and his account of the interview is printed by Froude. In February 1584-5 he was appointted to accompany Nau to the court of King James VI of Scotland, but his appointment was cancelled at the last minute.[14]

In March 1585 Waad was despatched to Paris[15] to demand the surrender of the conspirator Thomas Morgan. Henry III was willing to consider the request, but the Catholic League and the Guises were violently opposed to it and even instructed the Duc d'Aumale to waylay Waad and rescue Morgan on their way to the coast. Waad, however, convinced that he could not secure Morgan, contented himself with obtaining a promise that Morgan should be detained in prison in France, but Aumale nevertheless attacked the envoy near Amiens and inflicted on him a severe beating as an answer to his demand for the extradition of a Roman Catholic from France. In August, Waad accompanied William Davison to the Low Countries to negotiate an alliance with the States-General of the Netherlands.

A year later he took a prominent part in arranging the seizure of Mary Stuart's papers, which implicated her in the Babington Plot. He himself went down to Chartley in August 1586, and, while Mary was decoyed away on a hunting expedition, arrested her secretaries Nau and Curle, and having ransacked her cabinet, carried back a valuable collection of papers to London. For this important service he was paid thirty pounds.

In 1587 Waad was again in France. During the remainder of the reign of Elizabeth I of England, he was much occupied in searching for Jesuits and in discovering plots against the life of the queen.

James I, who knighted him in 1603. employed him in similar ways, and he was occupied that year in unravelling the Bye Plot and Main Plot. Waad was Lieutenant of the Tower of London at the time of the Gunpowder Plot and questioned Guy Fawkes. For some time Waad was a member of the Parliament of England, elected as MP for Aldborough (1584), Thetford (1589), Preston (1601) and West Looe (1604).

He retired from public life in 1613, at the instigation of Frances Howard, Countess of Essex. She wanted Wade replaced with a less honest Lieutenant of the Tower, Sir Gervase Helwys, as part of her scheme to murder the prisoner Thomas Overbury, who was opposed to her affair with Robert Carr.

Wade had allowed Lady Arbella Stuart a key to her quarters in the Tower, and this was made the pretext for his replacement by Helwys. Wade was later praised by Lloyd, who claimed that "to his directions we owe Rider's Dictionary, to his encouragement Hooker's Polity, and to his charge Gruter's Inscriptions.

A wall tablet within the church of St Mary the Virgin at Manuden in Essex commemorates Wade (named Waad on the tablet). He lived at Battles Hall in the village during his retirement. Wade died on 21 October 1623 and is buried in the church. He had been a shareholder in the Virginia Company, and the Wades of Virginia claim descent from his father.

from his wikipedia page


Clerk of the council, diplomatist, and lieutenant of the Tower.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wade_(English_politician)

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Sir William Wade's Timeline

1546
1546
Yorkshire, England (United Kingdom)
1574
1574
Age 28
1574
Age 28
1589
1589
Bellsize, Hampstead, Middlesex, England (United Kingdom)
1595
September 8, 1595
Poole, Dorset, England (United Kingdom)
1595
Dublin, County Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
1600
1600
Bishop'S Stortford, Essex, England, United Kingdom
1606
1606